WTGS Luncheon: Insights to Permian Stratigraphy in the Delaware Basin from the Largely Ignored Patterson Hills Outcrops

Abstract:

The spectacular Middle Permian outcrops of the Guadalupe and Delaware mountains have been studied for over 100 years, with intensive research following the realization that they expose the subsurface strata of the Permian Basin Petroleum Province.  However, the less imposing Patterson Hills have largely been ignored.  The Patterson Hills are a set of north northwest-south southeast trending hills that lie about 2 miles to the southwest of Guadalupe Peak and El Capitan. The topographically expressed Patterson Hills extend approximately 7 miles from northwest to southeast, and are approximately 3.5 miles wide perpendicular to the trend of the hills. They are composed of fault blocks antithetic to the main boundary fault at the western escarpment the Guadalupe Mountains, and contain the same succession of strata as the larger range.  The same strata also make up fault blocks just to the east that are not expressed as hills, but comprise relatively flat topography that underlies the Williams Ranch road and the alluvial apron between the Pattersons and Guadalupes.   

To the north and west the Patterson Hills mostly expose reefal Capitan facies, but to the south and east they provide outcrops of the basinal Delaware Mountain Group facies.  These strata were last studied closely by King (1948), and include several important fossil localities such as the locus typicus of the late Guadalupian ammonoid Strigogoniatites fountaini

This presentation will focus on three interesting insights provided by sections in the Patterson Hills.  One focus will be on a Delaware Mountain Group section that is almost entirely composed of carbonates, lacking the characteristic siliciclastics that dominate the section elsewhere.  This section exposes the equivalent of the South Wells to the Rader members beneath the Capitan Formation.  Another focus will be on numerous outcrops of the latest Guadalupian Reef Trail Member, although King did not recognize his “post-Lamar” strata in the Patterson Hills.  The Lamar-Reef Trail-Castile succession is widely exposed in southern parts of the outcrop area, with important biostratigraphic implications from recognizing the complete section.  The third focus will present a refined perspective on the timing of progradation by the Capitan Reef over basinal deposits, and the resulting suggestions about the geometry of the northern Delaware Basin margin and consequences for basin infill.

Speaker Lance L. Lambert
Lance L. Lambert is a Professor in the Geosciences Department at the University of Texas at San Antonio.  He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Geology from Texas A&M University, and his Ph.D. in Geology from the University of Iowa.  His research interests center on paleontology and stratigraphy of ...

Lance L. Lambert is a Professor in the Geosciences Department at the University of Texas at San Antonio.  He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Geology from Texas A&M University, and his Ph.D. in Geology from the University of Iowa.  His research interests center on paleontology and stratigraphy of the Late Paleozoic.  He is an active member on several task groups of the International Commission on Stratigraphy, which are working to formalize a single International Geologic Time Scale.  His dissertation work helped lead to ratification of the Guadalupian Series and its component Roadian, Wordian, and Capitanian stages as the international standards for the Middle Permian.  Since then he has continued research and publishing on various aspects of paleontology and stratigraphy in the Permian Basin.   


 

Full Description
Organizer West Texas Geological Society

When?

Tue, Feb. 11, 2014
11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.
(GMT-0600) US/Central

Event has ended

Where?

Midland Center
105 N. Main Street
Midland, TX 79701